Diagnostic Imaging Studies

The ImageCare Centers provide the most advanced diagnostic imaging.

MRI, MRA, Breast MRI, Breast MRI Biopsy, MRI Arthrogram

MRI, MRA, Breast MRI, Breast MRI Biopsy, MRI Arthrogram

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a test that uses a magnetic field and pulses of radio wave energy to make pictures of organs and structures inside the body. In many cases, MRI gives different information about structures in the body than can be seen with an X-ray, ultrasound, or computed tomography (CT) scan. MRI also may show problems that cannot be seen with other imaging methods. For an MRI test, the area of the body being studied is placed inside a special machine that contains a strong magnet. Pictures from an MRI scan are digital images that can be saved and stored on a computer for more study. The images also can be reviewed remotely, such as in a clinic or an operating room. In some cases, contrast material may be used during the MRI scan to show certain structures more clearly
CT, CTA, CT Arthrogram

CT, CTA, CT Arthrogram

LungScreening_100A computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to make detailed pictures of structures inside of the body. During the test, you will lie on a table that is attached to the CT scanner, which is a large doughnut-shaped machine. The CT scanner sends X-rays through the body area being studied. Each rotation of the scanner provides a picture of a thin slice of the organ   or area. All of the pictures are saved as a group on a computer. They also can be printed. In some cases, a dye called contrast material may be used. It may be put in a vein (IV) in your arm, or it may be placed into other parts of your body (such as the rectum or a joint) to see those areas better. For some types of CT scans, you drink the dye. The dye makes structures and organs easier to see on the CT pictures. A CT scan can be used to study all parts of your body, such as the chest, belly, pelvis, or an arm or leg. It can take pictures of body organs, such as the liver, pancreas, intestines, kidneys, bladder, adrenal glands, lungs, and heart. It also can study blood vessels, bones, and the spinal cord.

 

PET CT

Positrom Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography, also called PET Imaging or a PET Scan, is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to determine the severity of a variety of diseases.  Because nuclear medicine procedures are  able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages, as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic intervention.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound

OB/GYN, Breast, Abdomen, Vascular, General, Ultrasound Guided Biopsy

fetus 6Ultrasound testing helps in the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases and conditions, including stomach problems, gallbladder or pancreas problems, and abdominal pain. During an ultrasound test, high-frequency sound waves, inaudible to the human ear, are transmitted through body tissues using an instrument called a transducer, which transmits the information to a computer that displays the information on a monitor. Ultrasound is used to create images of soft tissue structures, such as the gallbladder, liver, kidneys, pancreas, bladder, and other organs and parts of the body. Ultrasound can also measure the flow of blood in the arteries to detect blockages. Ultrasound testing is safe and easy to perform.

Mammography

Mammography

Mammography is specialized medical imaging that uses a low-dose x-ray system to see inside the breasts. A mammography exam, called a mammogram, aids in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women. 3D mamography is an FDA approved technology that compliments traditional 2D mammography. When 3D and 2D mammography are used together, some studies show it many improve cancer detection rates. While traditional mammography generates a 2D image, tomosynthesis creates a 3D image of the breast allowing the radiologist to evaluate thing mammography sections of the breast, minimizing superimposed tissue.
X-Ray

X-Ray

An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging..
DEXA Bone Densitometry

DEXA Bone Densitometry

Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is the preferred technique for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). DEXA is relatively easy to perform and the amount of radiation exposure is low. A DEXA scanner is a machine that produces two X-ray beams, each with different energy levels. One beam is high energy while the other is low energy. The amount of X-rays that pass through the bone is measured for each beam. This will vary depending on the thickness of the bone. Based on the difference between the two beams, the bone density can be measured.